MOGA YOGA

Bhakti 101 / Fundamentals of Gaudiya Vaishnava Philosophy, Culture & Practice

Looking forward to this course on Bhakti Yoga, Saturdays, September - December.

Within the system of yoga, there are a handful of major branches of study and practice (hatha- physical; karma- selfless service; jnana- intellectual study of wisdom texts; bhakti- devotional science). Much of what we in the modern West consider as yoga falls within the hatha branch, addressing the purification and understanding of the body and mind.

Bhakti yoga addresses the purification and understanding of the heart and mind, guiding a thoughtful approach to timeless knowledge and a faithful approach to devotional practice.

Learn all that and much, much more in this three-month course starting September 27 at The Bhakti Center, 25 1st ave, NYC.

But the plain truth is this: love is not matter of getting what you want. Quite the contrary. The insistence on always having what you want, on always being satisfied, on always being fulfilled, makes love impossible. To love you have to climb out of the cradle, where everything is ‘getting’ and grow up to the maturity of giving, without concern for getting anything special in return. Love is not a deal, it is a sacrifice. It is not marketing, it is an act of worship.

Thomas Merton
Om ajnana-timirandhasya jnananjana-salakaya caksur unmilitam yena tasmai sri-gurave namah / I was born in the darkest ignorance, and my spiritual master opened my eyes with the torch of knowledge. I offer my respectful obeisances unto him.
I chant this before each class I teach, praying from my heart that the wisdom which has been passed down through the ages, through humble and right-minded servants of the truth, of the Lord, will be made available to others as it was meant to be understood, untainted by my own ignorance.

Om ajnana-timirandhasya jnananjana-salakaya
caksur unmilitam yena tasmai sri-gurave namah /
I was born in the darkest ignorance, and my spiritual master opened my eyes with the torch of knowledge. I offer my respectful obeisances unto him.

I chant this before each class I teach, praying from my heart that the wisdom which has been passed down through the ages, through humble and right-minded servants of the truth, of the Lord, will be made available to others as it was meant to be understood, untainted by my own ignorance.

In renovating my life I think, ‘I’m not demolishing the old or building anything new. Like an archeologist, I’m restoring the ancient: the pure self who continues blissfully despite bodily and mental unfolding or folding.’

Our material identification creates three kinds of urges—the urge to speak, the urge or demands of the mind and the demands of the body. When a living entity falls victim to these three types of urges, his life becomes inauspicious. One who practices resisting these demands or urges is called tapasvī or one who practices austerities. By such tapasya one can overcome victimization by the material energy, the external potency of the Supreme Personality of Godhead.

Prabhupada from ‘The Nectar of Instruction’